“When Life Gives You Lemons… Make Lemonade!!”

“When life gives you lemons… make lemonade!!”

When life gives you lemons, make lemonade” is a proverbial phrase used to encourage optimism and a positive can-do attitude in the face of adversity or misfortune. Lemons suggest sourness or difficulty in life, while lemonade is a sweet drink.

Ew.

What if it’s a really nasty, sour, and disgusting lemon? What if it’s — GASP! — not organic?

What if the lemon was not “given” to you, but pelted at you at full speed, with no warning?

What if you don’t even like lemonade?

What if you do like lemonade, but you’re just really tired and YOU DON’T WANT ANY FREAKING LEMONADE RIGHT NOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH!?!

I get the sentiment and all … lemons are sour and overwhelming if we just bite into them, but if we slice them open, massage and juice them, and then add a little glucose and hydration, we can make a bitter experience into a sweet one.

I’m all for seeing the good, and I also think both water and sugar can solve many problems… but you know what??

YOU DON’T HAVE TO MAKE THE FREAKING LEMONADE!

You don’t have to turn something bad into something good.

When the bad happens, the last thing we may want to do is make lemonade.

It’s true that profound transformations often emerge from deep suffering … but it’s also true that profound transformations take a long time.

And I guess that’s why I’m picking on this aphorism today: “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade!” is too easy. It means there’s ALWAYS a silver lining, and there’s an immediate, patently obvious thing to do with what has been given to you.

But life is not simple and obvious.

Sometimes it’s just bad, and complicated, and murky, and we have NO idea what to do.

At that point, we just need to sit with the bad.

One of my favorite “mommy mantras” is “Sit with the suck.”

Some parts of parenting (and work and life, etc.) just suck.

When we think we have to make lemonade and sweetness out of the suck, we just end up feeling more miserable.

What if we just sit with the suck?

And sometimes things don’t just suck — they’re plain shitty and painful and miserable. No amount of squeezing and straining them into a different form is going to help.

So we sit.

But sitting with the suck is not the same as wallowing in the suck.

Sitting with the suck means life gives you lemons, and you just decide you’re going to BE WITH the lemons.

You’re not going to yell at them or kick them or throw them at someone.

Or, actually, you might yell at them and get really mad at ALL THE LEMONS.

But the anger or frustration or sadness or righteous indignation or despair you feel about the lemons won’t be constant. It will ebb and flow and change. You’ll know this because you’re sitting with the lemons.

It might take just a few minutes of sitting with the lemons.

It might take a few months (lemons have a REALLY LONG shelf life).

But it’s not the lemon’s fault.

You’re just going to STAY with your hurt and your pain, because the only way out is through.

And then one day you might think, “I suppose I could try to make lemonade…”

Or perhaps you’ll think, “I do need just a little bit of lemon zest for this dinner recipe…”

Or you might just say, “This kitchen stinks — I’m just going to grind up the lemons in the garbage disposal…”

There are lots of uses for lemons.

You don’t have to make lemonade.

When it’s bad, you don’t have to be all heroic and turn the bad into something good.

I mean, you can if you want to. If you’re ready, and you know the recipe, go ahead and make it.

But if you need to feel the bad, then feel the bad. Reach out and talk to people about the bad. There are lots of us out there who are familiar with citric suffering.

And don’t forget the oft-forgotten option between good and bad, acid and base — neutral.

You can be neutral about lemons, too.

So, with all due apologies to the lemon, lemonade, and truism industries, I think we’ve maxed out this maxim.

The next time life gives you lemons, just tell yourself that as far as adages go, this one’s, well . . . , a lemon.

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Do You Think That You Are Spiritual?

”Defining Spiritual”

Do you think that you are spiritual? What makes you think so? Have you ever considered what it really takes to be spiritual? Is it in being part of a religion, or not being part of a religion? Does one need to study spiritual disciplines or have some accreditation in spirituality to be spiritual? Is it in the books one reads, or events one attends, or rituals they practice? Does being a good person make you spiritual? And what does it mean to be good? Is spirituality found in how we talk, how we act, what we wear, or what jobs we hold? Does being spiritual mean you have to forgo material goods or financial wealth? Is spirituality inherited or is it learned? All of these are important questions to consider for yourself to explore your ideas and beliefs about spirituality because what limits our growth and fullest life expression is not how spiritual we may ever become but how restricted we are by our belief systems. The more rigid and narrow our thinking, the more we miss and dismiss the big picture of it all.

In truth, spirituality isn’t one fixed state, it is dynamic. It is also not easily defined. It is expressed in degrees, along with a spectrum that will vary and change throughout our lives. Sure, spirituality can include all, some or none of the things mentioned above. They are all more like the decorations on a holiday tree. What we want to get at, to best understand spirituality and what it truly means to be spiritual, is the core. In the case of our analogy, the tree itself. The core of your being is where we will find the best representation of your spirituality. Let’s explore this further.

Notice that the word spiritual has the word spirit in it. Right from the start, this should imply some good understanding of and connection with our spirit, and Spirit in the bigger sense. How well do you know yourself to be more than your body or mind? In truth, we are neither of these things and the more we grasp and feel and know this, the more we tap into the core of spirituality. There is more to you and more to life than meets the eye, and it is in that internal knowing that we access the deepest states of spirituality and parts of our spiritual nature.

Other than that, the core of Spirit, as we’ve been guided to see, feel and understand through the ages is love. Now of course how we each understand and define love will vary subjectively, just like any other term or concept. At the highest level though, we can say that love is being connected. It is all-encompassing, non-discriminating and unconditional. Love respects, nurtures, honors and does not impose or impede upon the will of another. Love is also internal, it starts with us and how we treat ourselves. This then spills out and over to all other things and beings, expressions and experiences. Most importantly, love is a state of being, not a state of doing. We can say and do all sorts of things to appear loving to ourselves or others, but if it is not coming from a state of love at the being level, it is just an imitation of love.

That is it, two simple, yet deeply profound parts that make up the core of spirituality. And to me, this is what it is most about; the more connected one is and the more love one expresses universally, the more spirituality is embodied at its core. There is no need to decorate this, it is pure and whole all on its own. And it is unmistakable and evident in those who truly experience it.

How do we reach or develop through that spiritual core of our being? Well, this is where those books, or events, or lifestyle changes can help. They won’t necessarily make you spiritual, but they can point the way to develop the core of your being and strengthen your connection to Spirit and expressions of love. Ultimately, spirituality is always there, within us. We don’t need to do something to get it, we just need to get out of our own way with all of our beliefs and preconceptions to experience it, and allow this natural state of our Divine being to come through.

Externally, spirituality can easily be faked and imitated, and whether consciously or unconsciously, we can fool ourselves and others into thinking all sorts of things about our spirituality. On an internal level, however, spirituality cannot be faked. Either we feel connected or we don’t. Either we are feeling and/or expressing love towards ourselves, others, all living beings and our Earth, or we aren’t. There is no space for excuses here or any kind of justification. This is why, one of the most beautiful and integral parts of being spiritual is having spiritual integrity, which we will discuss in more detail later on in this article.

Where Does God Fit In?

Of course, a major consideration when discussing the realm of spirituality is God. I’ve often been asked about the importance or significance of this connection, and whether one has to believe in God in order to be spiritual, Can We Be Spiritual Without a Belief in God? and the quick answer is ‘yes’.

Just like with the term spiritual, the first thing to consider is what we believe or understand God to be. I think it is clear to most of us these days that we do not all perceive God or agree on who or what “God” is in the same way. As our consciousness expands and our understanding broadens, so does our concept of God. From a stern, male figure in the clouds, we’ve seen the evolution of God itself to a more loving and gender-neutral entity over time. Said in another way, God evolves as we evolve. The more connected we become and the more we are able to conceive higher realms of existence, the more sophisticated our model of God becomes. It is naive after all, to think that we can grasp ‘God’ with our limited and narrowly tuned consciousness of this reality. While you are a whole and complete being, I think it is safe to say that none of us are “the Whole” of it all. And so how can apart properly and fully understand the Whole? It can grasp some aspect of the Whole, but unless and until it fully becomes or merges with the Whole it can only depict parts of the Whole and assign its own characteristics to it. This is all too evident throughout our society. The more whole you know yourself to be, the more fully you can grasp the wholeness of God.

Given our varying definitions of terms like spiritual and love, applied to our varying definitions of God, I trust you can see by now that it is no easy feat to classify everyone in the same way. This is just another reason why there are many spiritual people who do not consider themselves spiritual, yet are, and there are many people who consider themselves spiritual or who we may label as spiritual, who do not actually embody the core of spirituality. We can conclude the same here about God. What God means varies drastically amongst people, and believing in God and being spiritual can be two very exclusive things.

Where Do Rituals Fit In?

Another important area for consideration under the umbrella of spirituality, which creates a lot of confusion and misrepresentation, is that of rituals. With the expansion of and popularity of all things spiritual, many rituals have arisen on top of the many already existing ones. Since we’ve become a highly materialistic and productivity-focused society, it is no coincidence that today many people are more attracted to doing spiritual things and having spiritual things, than actually being spiritual.

Recall that spirituality is all about being connected to Spirit and expressing the highest state of love. It is not found in cards or crystals, mantras or affirmations, or any kind of worship. If you rely on or use any “spiritual rituals” I invite you to examine your rituals, what you do and most importantly why you do it. Many rituals can be nice and helpful, but the intention behind their use is what matters most. For example, if you are doing anything out of fear, then you’ve blocked your connection to Source and love. For example, some people use specific rituals to “protect” themselves from “negative energies”. This is an example of doing something out of fear. In truth, you have nothing to protect yourself from, nothing to fear and no “negative energies” can impact you if YOU are connected and vibrating at a high frequency of love. (Low-frequency energies can only attract and impact similar low-frequency energies.)

All too often, unfortunately, rituals are unconsciously used to prop up the spiritual identity of the Ego. By doing something spiritual, we then mistook ourselves for being spiritual, but the two are by no means equivalent. So if there is some act or tool that you would like to use or engage with, it can be just fine as long as you are doing it for the love of doing, not because you think you have to or think you should. Keep the thinking of it, in fact, to avoid fueling your Ego’s spiritual identity. Follow the wisdom of your heart instead. This is perhaps the best and most important “ritual” if you’d like to call it that, that anyone can ever practice.

Ultimately, nothing spiritual needs to be done to be spiritual. A ritual can point the way, but it is not the way. Yes, some tools, props or rituals can be valuable, but they are not required. You don’t need to chant, or read angel cards, or sleep with crystals under your pillow. You can if you like and if that brings you joy, but you don’t have to. The intention is where it is all at. This is the power and potential of our Divine-human nature: we can create through intention.

Spiritual Integrity

One of the biggest areas therefore to understand true spirituality is to know that there is a big difference between “thinking it” and “bring it”. I can read all the spiritual books and attend all the spiritual programs, and even get myself a spiritual Guru to learn from, but this is no guarantee of me having spiritual integrity. Sure to onlookers, my efforts may appear very noble, but so do those of the people who walk into churches each Sunday week after week, year after year. Do you see the connection? On the surface, it all appears lovely, but beneath the surface, it lacks substance. With such an approach no wonder we can’t seem to get anywhere, personally and collectively on Earth. How many Sundays in church or hours of meditation will it take for us to stop acts of violence against other humans or animals? Many people I come across, for example, complain that they mediate and it doesn’t help much, or that they study the work of various spiritual teachers or texts and nothing really changes. And it won’t until you choose to change!

Spirituality is neither instant magic nor a laborious quest. It is, as with all things, what we choose to make of it. This includes what we allow ourselves to express and what we are ready to experience. Some people meditate for years and their life and sense of inner peace is no better than some of those who never try meditation. Others may have one profound experience in nature and have their lives completely transformed. There is no pattern, no formula, no guarantee. It all and always comes down to what you make of it.

We can hide behind spiritual talk, wear spiritual clothes, or attend spiritual programs, but more often than not, these just create a lovely new identity for the Ego to uphold, as shared in the ritual section above. True spirituality is lived and embodied, and ultimately needs none of those things. Why? Because we are the spirit at the core of our being. We are always connected. What we do, however, in this life experience is a block that connection with the many illusions and limits that we put upon ourselves or buy into. Then yes, it seems necessary to take “the spiritual journey” to unblock all that, but the truth is that liberation is a choice that takes a moment. You don’t need practices, rituals, or lifetimes. You only need this moment. What do you choose? Love, or not? Peace, or not? Do you choose heart-centered thoughts, words, and actions, or do you choose behavior that is out of alignment with the highest expressions of love and peace?

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines integrity as “the quality of being honest and fair”, and “the state of being complete or whole”. While it is essential, to be honest with ourselves in any spiritual undertakings, I believe it is in that latter or second definition that we get the most benefit for understanding what spiritual integrity is all about. Think about it, if we are complete or whole we don’t compete for attention or affection with others, or compete for anything in fact. If we are complete and whole, we don’t need anything from the outside to make us feel complete and whole. If we are complete and whole, we recognize our incredible potential. If we are complete and whole, we don’t act from fear. I hope you see how profound these implications are when it comes to understanding what it really means to be spiritual, and how they can be applied to every area of your life; every thought, word and action you have or make. From your relationships to your work, from your food to your lifestyle choices, it all counts!

Does such spiritual integrity raise the bar too high? I don’t think so. I think it is time for us to stop playing small, stop deluding ourselves, and step up to the plate of our human and divine potential. There are a time and place for games, but this is not it. If we want to understand ourselves, our origin, our purpose, and our reality, we need to stop sabotaging ourselves. If you want an authentic life, if you want to transcend human drama and suffering, if you want to have a positive impact on others, if you want to know the highest potential of your being, then this is it: Embrace and embody spiritual integrity.

Conclusion

As I shared with you in the introduction, if we want depth, we must go below the surface. This is the crux of it all. Labelling ourselves or any other person as spiritual is no reflection of the truth, it is just a label, a surface perception. True spirituality is lived and embodied in how we act and respond to ourselves, others, nature, and all life. And we should never be concerned with how spiritual or not spiritual others are, but focus on us, ourselves. This is where the rubber meets the road because unless and until we attain some profound level of telepathic communication we will never really know what is in the mind and heart of any other. Besides, this is your journey, so focus on who YOU are.

And if you want the many beautiful and transformational benefits that come from true spirituality, you must be willing to dive beneath the surface. The deeper you go, the more perspective you gain, and the more connected you become. And the more you strengthen your connection, the more complete and whole you know yourself to be, and the more your life becomes a living testament to love, joy, and peace.

”Yoga And Spirituality”

The word yoga means to join or unite, and yogis view this unison in different ways – the unison of body, mind, and spirit, uniting all the aspects of yourself, or uniting with a higher power or spiritual force. You can believe in a God or gods, or nothing at all.

What does spirituality mean to you? Like yoga itself, spirituality is personal yet universal. Many people practice yoga as a means to a toned body and an hour of peace away from the office. But for others looking for their path through life, yoga goes deeper. For many people, spirituality is the answer to the question “what makes yoga special?”

The Spiritual Stretch=‘Wellness is a connection of paths: knowledge and action.”

“Lack of activity destroys the good condition of every human being, while movement and methodical physical exercise save it and preserve it.”

Yoga is physical, for sure. Regularly practicing yoga develops your stamina, your strength, and your rockstar abs. Postures challenge the body. However, yoga is also a mental practice where you work through emotional stress and psychological challenges – you may even meditate.

“Yoga is the fountain of youth. You’re only as young as your spine is flexible.” Bob Harper.

If you sign up for yoga classes because you want a thin body or the ability to master a handstand then you are skimming the surface of the practice. If you enjoy yoga for the health benefits then you will certainly feel better with regular sessions. But without the spiritual side, yoga is simply a stretch class, a gym session, or a space for relaxation. Go deeper, and you’ll find so much more.

Cultivating Awareness

When committing to yoga practice on a regular basis, yogis seek to experience and become aware of the spirit, or the energy, within and without. We’re not talking about ghostly spirits here, or some supernatural being – spirit is higher consciousness; a driving force, a motivation, a reason behind everything we think and everything we do. Being aware of this energy is something spiritual. Therefore, awareness is critical to yoga as a spiritual practice.

Think of the expression “the mat is your mirror.” When you turn up to the mat you bring yourself – only yourself and all of yourself. If you practice yoga with an awareness of yourself you come to learn about the different ways you act, how you react, and what you are like – in creating awareness of yourself you can transform your mind, which in turn affects how you live your life and how you interact with others.

Relinquishing Control

Watch out – awareness doesn’t always lead to the place you want to go. Yoga as a spiritual practice is not about changing your life so you can earn more money, be a “better” person, or score a job you love. Yoga is not about getting rid of the negative by controlling your mind and your environment.

Rather, practicing yoga reminds you there is no “sweet spot” – there will always be a barking dog, a car that runs out of gas, a bad-tempered boss or an inattentive lover. There will always be something you could do without, or improve. Developing a spiritual side with yoga is about holding your pose regardless of the circumstances through an awareness of yourself and your experience.

A Quiet Peaceful Mind

“Meditation brings wisdom; lack of meditation leaves ignorance. Know well what leads you forward and what holds you back, and choose the path that leads to wisdom.“ Buddha.

Most of the time, we are busy analyzing our actions and focusing on our physical performance instead of simply being. How can you develop awareness without taking the time and space to connect deeper within yourself?

Yoga gives you the space to do just that. Many teachers will talk about the importance of the quiet mind – push yourself through the highly physical postures in order to be exhausted enough to let go into your quiet mind or sacred inner space. Just be. Don’t expect positivity, peacefulness or happiness, but if it does come, be aware of it.

Be aware of what you experience, and be grateful. Taking this attitude of gratitude and surrender into your everyday life away from the mat makes yoga a spiritual practice.

Yoga Is Not a Religion

You can be of any faith or have no faith to practice yoga – yoga is not a religious practice, and the spiritual side of yoga is not linked to any organized form of worship. The word yoga means to join or unite, and yogis view this unison in different ways – the unison of body, mind, and spirit, uniting all the aspects of yourself, or uniting with a higher power or spiritual force.

You can believe in a God or gods, or nothing at all. Sometimes working through asanas can be like a prayer – moving quietly, reverently, focused on the breath. But equally, your prayer could come the next day, when you feel a jolt of recognition and completion, and are taken back to how you felt when you were truly in the moment, on the mat.

Perhaps yoga is a way of cultivating wholeness, remembering wholeness, and recognizing this wholeness everywhere – for many yogis, that is the spiritual side of the practice.

 

''Yoga And Spirituality''

The word yoga means to join or unite, and yogis view this unison in different ways – the unison of body, mind, and spirit, uniting all the aspects of yourself, or uniting with a higher power or spiritual force. You can believe in a God or gods, or nothing at all.

What does spirituality mean to you? Like yoga itself, spirituality is personal yet universal. Many people practice yoga as a means to a toned body and an hour of peace away from the office. But for others looking for their path through life, yoga goes deeper. For many people, spirituality is the answer to the question “what makes yoga special?”

The Spiritual Stretch=‘Wellness is a connection of paths: knowledge and action.”

“Lack of activity destroys the good condition of every human being, while movement and methodical physical exercise save it and preserve it.”

Yoga is physical, for sure. Regularly practicing yoga develops your stamina, your strength, and your rockstar abs. Postures challenge the body. However, yoga is also a mental practice where you work through emotional stress and psychological challenges – you may even meditate.

“Yoga is the fountain of youth. You’re only as young as your spine is flexible.” Bob Harper.

If you sign up for yoga classes because you want a thin body or the ability to master a handstand then you are skimming the surface of the practice. If you enjoy yoga for the health benefits then you will certainly feel better with regular sessions. But without the spiritual side, yoga is simply a stretch class, a gym session, or a space for relaxation. Go deeper, and you’ll find so much more.

Cultivating Awareness

When committing to yoga practice on a regular basis, yogis seek to experience and become aware of the spirit, or the energy, within and without. We’re not talking about ghostly spirits here, or some supernatural being – spirit is higher consciousness; a driving force, a motivation, a reason behind everything we think and everything we do. Being aware of this energy is something spiritual. Therefore, awareness is critical to yoga as a spiritual practice.

Think of the expression “the mat is your mirror.” When you turn up to the mat you bring yourself – only yourself and all of yourself. If you practice yoga with an awareness of yourself you come to learn about the different ways you act, how you react, and what you are like – in creating awareness of yourself you can transform your mind, which in turn affects how you live your life and how you interact with others.

Relinquishing Control

Watch out – awareness doesn’t always lead to the place you want to go. Yoga as a spiritual practice is not about changing your life so you can earn more money, be a “better” person, or score a job you love. Yoga is not about getting rid of the negative by controlling your mind and your environment.

Rather, practicing yoga reminds you there is no “sweet spot” – there will always be a barking dog, a car that runs out of gas, a bad-tempered boss or an inattentive lover. There will always be something you could do without, or improve. Developing a spiritual side with yoga is about holding your pose regardless of the circumstances through an awareness of yourself and your experience.

A Quiet Peaceful Mind

“Meditation brings wisdom; lack of meditation leaves ignorance. Know well what leads you forward and what holds you back, and choose the path that leads to wisdom.“ Buddha.

Most of the time, we are busy analyzing our actions and focusing on our physical performance instead of simply being. How can you develop awareness without taking the time and space to connect deeper within yourself?

Yoga gives you the space to do just that. Many teachers will talk about the importance of the quiet mind – push yourself through the highly physical postures in order to be exhausted enough to let go into your quiet mind or sacred inner space. Just be. Don’t expect positivity, peacefulness or happiness, but if it does come, be aware of it.

Be aware of what you experience, and be grateful. Taking this attitude of gratitude and surrender into your everyday life away from the mat makes yoga a spiritual practice.

Yoga Is Not a Religion

You can be of any faith or have no faith to practice yoga – yoga is not a religious practice, and the spiritual side of yoga is not linked to any organized form of worship. The word yoga means to join or unite, and yogis view this unison in different ways – the unison of body, mind, and spirit, uniting all the aspects of yourself, or uniting with a higher power or spiritual force.

You can believe in a God or gods, or nothing at all. Sometimes working through asanas can be like a prayer – moving quietly, reverently, focused on the breath. But equally, your prayer could come the next day, when you feel a jolt of recognition and completion, and are taken back to how you felt when you were truly in the moment, on the mat.

Perhaps yoga is a way of cultivating wholeness, remembering wholeness, and recognizing this wholeness everywhere – for many yogis, that is the spiritual side of the practice.

 

The Moirai (Moerae)-” Decide Fates Or Person’s Destiny”

The Moirai (Moerae), also referred to as the Fates, represent the idea of “destiny” in Greek mythology. The Ancient Greeks had a habit of creating deities to represent abstract concepts as a way of explaining their world. However, the Moirai do more than just represent destiny – they are the personification of it. It is understood that the Moirai controlled people’s lives in different ways from the time they were born to the time they died.

It is interesting to note that the word, Moirai, meant a portion or a part of a whole in Ancient Greek. The connotation here is that it referred to a portion of a bounty, as would be the case if people were to divide up a treasure. Thus, the Morai were seen as being keepers of a person’s destiny, or her specific allotment of life. Here’s more information about who the Moirai were and the role they played in Greek mythology.

Who the Moirai (Moerae) Were

It is largely understood that the Moirai, or the Fates, were three of the six children that Themis, the goddess of Justice, and Zeus, the king of the gods, had together. The other three children were the Horai, or the Hours. The names of the three Fates were Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. They each had their own, unique characteristics.

  • Clotho. She was known as the spinner because she “spun” the very thread of a person’s life. She spun the thread from her Distaff directly to her Spindle.
  • Lachesis – Once Clotho spun the thread, Lachesis would measure it for each person. Each person had different lengths of thread, indicated that they all had different life spans.
  • Atropos – She was responsible for cutting the thread, which indicates that she controlled when life would end. She also chose the way each person would die.

As you can see, Clotho was always associated with the beginning of life. She essentially created it by spinning the thread. Lachesis controlled the length of a person’s life, and Atropos was always associated with death. Thus, the three Fates essentially represent Birth, Life, and Death.

The Appearance of the Moirai

Unlike their siblings, the Horai, the Moirai were always depicted as ugly old women. Note that the Horai were always depicted as young, beautiful women. The Ancient Greeks appeared to have feared the Moirai. After all, one of the Fates (Moerae) were said to have controlled every aspect of a person’s life, including their death. As a result, most Ancient Greeks feared them and as a result, they imagined them with unflattering appearances. They were also depicted as crippled, stern, inflexible, and severe. They were usually depicted together as a group of three and they were often depicted with their objects. For instance, Clotho was usually shown with her spindle and Atropos was depicted with her cutting shears.

The Moirai, also referred to as the Fates, were an interesting part of Greek mythology. They were three of the children of Themis and Zeus and they were always associated with a person’s destiny.

The Moirai (Moerae)-'' Decide Fates Or Person's Destiny''

The Moirai (Moerae), also referred to as the Fates, represent the idea of “destiny” in Greek mythology. The Ancient Greeks had a habit of creating deities to represent abstract concepts as a way of explaining their world. However, the Moirai do more than just represent destiny – they are the personification of it. It is understood that the Moirai controlled people’s lives in different ways from the time they were born to the time they died.

It is interesting to note that the word, Moirai, meant a portion or a part of a whole in Ancient Greek. The connotation here is that it referred to a portion of a bounty, as would be the case if people were to divide up a treasure. Thus, the Morai were seen as being keepers of a person’s destiny, or her specific allotment of life. Here’s more information about who the Moirai were and the role they played in Greek mythology.

Who the Moirai (Moerae) Were

It is largely understood that the Moirai, or the Fates, were three of the six children that Themis, the goddess of Justice, and Zeus, the king of the gods, had together. The other three children were the Horai, or the Hours. The names of the three Fates were Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. They each had their own, unique characteristics.

  • Clotho. She was known as the spinner because she “spun” the very thread of a person’s life. She spun the thread from her Distaff directly to her Spindle.
  • Lachesis – Once Clotho spun the thread, Lachesis would measure it for each person. Each person had different lengths of thread, indicated that they all had different life spans.
  • Atropos – She was responsible for cutting the thread, which indicates that she controlled when life would end. She also chose the way each person would die.

As you can see, Clotho was always associated with the beginning of life. She essentially created it by spinning the thread. Lachesis controlled the length of a person’s life, and Atropos was always associated with death. Thus, the three Fates essentially represent Birth, Life, and Death.

The Appearance of the Moirai

Unlike their siblings, the Horai, the Moirai were always depicted as ugly old women. Note that the Horai were always depicted as young, beautiful women. The Ancient Greeks appeared to have feared the Moirai. After all, one of the Fates (Moerae) were said to have controlled every aspect of a person’s life, including their death. As a result, most Ancient Greeks feared them and as a result, they imagined them with unflattering appearances. They were also depicted as crippled, stern, inflexible, and severe. They were usually depicted together as a group of three and they were often depicted with their objects. For instance, Clotho was usually shown with her spindle and Atropos was depicted with her cutting shears.

The Moirai, also referred to as the Fates, were an interesting part of Greek mythology. They were three of the children of Themis and Zeus and they were always associated with a person’s destiny.

”Living On A Moment”

You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. Fools stand on their island of opportunities and look toward another land. There is no other land; there is no other life but this.

To live in the moment, or now, means being conscious, aware and in the present with all of your senses. It means not dwelling on the past, nor being anxious or worrying about the future.

When we concentrate our attention on the present we focus on the task at hand. We give our full attention to what we are doing and we let go of outcomes.

The present moment is filled with joy and happiness. If you are attentive, you will see it.

Seizing each moment in life allows us to prolong its value and make it more meaningful. Rather than seeking quantity of time, when we live in the moment we enjoy and savor every minute. We don’t sacrifice quality for quantity.

Of course, this doesn’t mean we don’t need to plan, set goals or prepare for the future. We can do all of these things and still enjoy each moment as it unfolds.

For instance, if we have set a goal to exercise each day, we would carry on with it while enjoying the actual process, or moment, of exercising (or at least be in the moment of it).

When we train ourselves to live in each moment, we immerse ourselves in it and begin to discover its beauty and wonder. We learn to focus and how to manage our energy. Professional athletes understand and employ this kind of focus very well. They know that accomplishment and success are a result of the skillful management and balancing of energy.

To make every moment count we must embrace it. Everything we do and every person we come in contact with deserves our full attention. Even when resting we should savor the moment. It gives us the opportunity to recharge, renew and gain clarity.

Quite often we put huge expectations on ourselves and our lives. We rush to do this, hurry up with that, without actually enjoying the process. What’s the rush? Where do we think we’re going?

If we don’t stop and think about where we’re at, we’re probably missing the point. Instead, when we appreciate each moment and garner the lessons from it, we live consciously, purposefully and responsibly.

Likewise, when we live in the past and don’t let go of painful experiences, perceived wrongs, or difficult times, we condemn ourselves to a present and future of the same. We cannot change the past. We can, however, come to terms with it, know that it’s over, and move on.

Living in the present moment creates the experience of eternity.

Living in the moment means letting go of the past and trust in the future. When we are positive and optimistic in the present, we open the possibility of a positive and promising future. We owe it to ourselves to make every moment count – now!

Tips To Live On The Moment:-

  • Train your mind to focus on the current activity.
  • Engage in, and feel what you are doing. Enjoy the process.
  • Learn relaxation techniques in order to be present in each moment.
  • Take notice of your surroundings – sights, sounds, smells, ambiance.
  • Listen attentively to the conversation of others, music, even silence.
  • Savor your food and drink. Taste each morsel.