”Sexuality And Spirituality”

”Although the detail of our sexual energies and their objects and objectives vastly vary, the existence of our sexuality itself is an undeniable truth.”

Mention the word sex and eyes widen and ears perk up. The strong reaction the subject arouses reflects the spicy nature of sexual energy. We may be at the gym feeling tired and depleted, but if someone we find attractive starts working out next to us, our energy level is suddenly boosted. That energetic intensification represents the activation of our Lower Dantian (energy center below the navel), which holds our sexual energy in reserve.

Pure sexual energy is as unstable as dynamite and just as explosive. It can transport us to sublime states of bliss and delight, or cast us into the darkest pits of anguish, terror, and depravity. The volatile and wild nature of sexual energy convinced some religious traditions to view it as an impediment to spiritual development, and to some degree this belief still continues to perpetuate in the popular imagination because of the confusion, heartache, and pain that sexual intimacy can cause.

To demonstrate this, rank the following three words from the most to the least spiritual: wisdom, love, sex. If we took a poll, the top position might be a tossup between wisdom and love, but without a doubt sex would rank last on the list. No one questions the connection between spirituality and love or spirituality and wisdom. But the link between spirituality and sexuality is a harder sell.

From the Qigong perspective, however, the notion that sexuality and spirituality are antithetical is misguided, because sexual energy forms one of the cornerstones of happiness. If we ever hope to secure long-lasting happiness in a loving relationship, we must heal our socially conditioned distortions about sexuality. We must erase the invisible line we draw with our minds around our beltlines, above which lies the greater part of human nature and below which lies the lesser. In essence, we must spiritualize sex.

”I think sexuality is a window into someone’s soul.”

But how do we redeem sexuality and elevate it to the spiritual status it deserves? How do we reconcile the square of sex with the circle of spirit when sexual pleasure is often responsible for so much shame, trauma, and pain? One place to begin searching for an answer to these questions lies in identifying the fundamental, seemingly irreconcilable differences between male and female sexuality. Those differences swiftly become apparent in the bedroom.

Stereotypically, male sexual energy flares up and is exhausted quickly, like a match, while female sexual energy boils slowly and remains hot for a long time, like a pot of boiling water. These different tempos are a source of shame for men who climax too fast and frustration for women who may not climax at all. This problem is then compounded by the notorious fact that when male sexual energy is activated men often become emotionally unavailable, and the other notorious fact that the female sexual experience is often laden with sentimentalism that men normally can’t relate to.

Obviously, we can’t alter our sexual instincts. What we can do, however, is use spiritual practice to overcome the limitations imposed by nature on our sexuality. In fact, we can transform the inherent mismatch between male and female sexuality into an incredible opportunity for spiritual growth.

Let’s begin by considering the way Qigong can help a man harness his sexual energy. When male sexual energy is aroused, it intensifies locally around the genitals and quickly flows out of the body. That is the natural pattern of male sexual energy. But men can learn to reverse that flow and direct their sexual essence upward, toward the Middle Dantian (energy center at located at the heart level). By doing so, a man accomplishes two goals. First, he diminishes the urge to ejaculate, and second, as sexual energy rises to his heart, passion blends with love and tenderness. A man who masters this skill is able to prolong intercourse indefinitely and deepen his emotional connection during lovemaking.

When female sexual energy is aroused, it naturally flows inward and upward from the genitals toward the heart. Stimulation of the breasts further activates the Middle Dantian (energy center at located at the heart level) and reinforces an emotional response. Unlike men, women don’t need to practice Qigong to integrate their sexual vitality with their love. These qualities mingle naturally, and in this respect, female sexuality is inherently more integrated.

But through spiritual practice both women and men can learn to integrate their sexual energy to even higher levels. Sexual vitality can be directed upward from the heart to the top of the head, where it becomes infused with the blissful quality of sacredness. And from there, sexual vitality can be circulated through the Central Meridian Meridian (the energy channel that unifies the three main energy centers — the Dantians) into the sky, where it is experienced as heavenly ecstasy.

Sexuality that centers on the genitals and the Lower Dantian (energy center below the navel) corresponds to passionate sex. Sexuality that integrates the sexual vitality of the Lower Dantian with the heart-centered energy of the Middle Dantian corresponds to intense lovemaking. Sexuality that integrates all three dantians corresponds to blissful sacred love. And sexuality that integrates the all three dantians and the Central Meridian corresponds to cosmic ecstasy.

Cosmic ecstasy is vastly more intense, pleasurable, and meaningful than even the most passionate sex. Comparing the two is like contrasting a bathtub with the ocean.

There is no surer way to bring long-lasting happiness into an intimate relationship than to ground it in enduring bliss.

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”Life In The Fields Of Sorrow”

* Accepting Life as it Is Without Sorrow or Emotional Reaction:-

Common definitions of compassion read like the following: a feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken with misfortune, accompanied by a strong desire to alleviate the suffering. These definitions create the idea that compassion requires us to join another in their misery. Does this really help anyone? We may need a definition of compassion that is more powerful. For true compassion, we will have to expand our understanding so we don’t mistakenly create more sorrow from suffering.

Let us consider a definition which does not require us to suffer. What if compassion is simply the active expression of acceptance for the world and people just as they are? It entails a state of mind where there is no judgment about a situation or a person. True compassion is being able to look at the whole world without expectations that it should be any different. We can still hold a vision of possibility for the world, but we don’t use it as a standard of comparison for rejecting where the world is right now. In this way, we can avoid the personal emotional reactions that create sadness, sorrow or pity.

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In Buddhist practices sadness, sorrow, and pity are referred to as the near enemies of compassion. Being compassionate involves understanding the suffering of another without feeling sorrow or pity. When there are these emotions, compassion has turned into personal unhappiness and only adds to suffering. Feeling the emotional pain of another doesn’t relieve their suffering. In actuality, it adds to the collective field of unconsciousness creating suffering.

If someone is suffering from hunger then it is more appropriate to provide nourishing food. If they are thirsty, provide them something to drink. If someone is in emotional pain bring your love and unconditional acceptance. It would not help people for the caretakers to go hungry and thirsty also. Although this is often the approach people take with their empathy or sympathy when people are without love and acceptance. When caretakers have an emotional reaction of sadness or sorrow they nourish no one. A compassionate person brings the nourishment of love and acceptance to the situation that is starving for those emotions until someone can feed themselves.

Sometimes the best action you can take to help relieve the emotional suffering of another is being present with your attention on the person and say nothing. Oddly enough modern physics tell us that our attention transforms the experience. Although slow, other options are driven by impatience and reaction usually create more chaos. Trying to change someone’s emotion is often driven out of judgment for that and sends a message of rejection.In my own personal process, I did more harm than good when I tried to help. The desire to alleviate suffering is real, but the in which this is actually done is not apparent, nor is it usually our first reaction.

During the first couple years of intense personal growth, I gained clarity on how people created suffering through the beliefs in their mind. I could see the habitual roles they were playing and the emotional reactions they were creating for themselves. The bad news was that I didn’t have much self-awareness in what to do and what not to do.

During that time I was eager to point out what people were doing and what they could do to change it. I was not aware that I was serving my conceptual idea of what should be, instead of serving them. By my suggestions of what they should do I was sending the message, “You should change.” Which is usually interpreted as, “I don’t accept you the way you are.” I was unaware that in trying to help, I was saying, “I reject you the way you are.” I was unaware that I was stirring up more emotions related to lack of acceptance.

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Quietly sitting and listening to someone sends a powerful message of acceptance to them. They may feel that the whole world is wrong, but if one person accepts them unconditionally they may begin to feel more accepting of themselves. This is the seed of change that brings a new perspective.

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  • Our Heroic Need to Help and Fix a Situation Can Be Motivated by Selfishness:-
    While the desire to make someone feel better is a natural human desire, it can be distorted in our mind. If we react to another person’s situation with sadness, frustration, or anger we will desire to stop feeling these unpleasant emotions. Our mind holds an outside situation as responsible for our sorrow or pity. Unaware of how we are creating our own reactions, our desire to make ourselves feel better drives us to change others. We are overlooking the role of our beliefs, assumptions, and interpretations in creating our own emotions. In trying to change another we have lost our respect and acceptance of another for where they are.

An example of this was a woman who was intent on saving the world from suffering. She saw people being unhappy and was sad for them and frustrated for their circumstances. She saw people drowning in a sea of emotional suffering and her emotional reactions motivated her to dive in to save them. I asked her if she could lift herself into a boat of happiness with the world the way it is. “No,” she replied. She was an unhappy person that wanted to guide the world to be happy, but couldn’t get herself in the boat.

I pointed out that if we followed her logic we would all end up drowning together. If I saw her suffering and unhappy then I would feel sad for her. Now there would be two unhappy people. If two people saw us and took the same approach then there would be four people suffering from our frustration and sadness. Four more people could feel saddened and frustrated by our plight and then there would be eight more in the water. If we keep going in this direction the whole world would end up feeling sorrow and pity because one person was unhappy. She began to see that her logic of outrage, sorrow, and pity helped no one.

Helping someone from drowning in emotional suffering has to be done from within the boat of compassion, acceptance, and love. Diving into sorrow and pity your self will not help anyone and only adds to the number of the waters. Some resist this approach and call it selfish to put your happiness first. I disagree. Having emotional reactions and feeling offended when the world is not living according to our personal beliefs is the act of selfishness. I see expressing love for yourself and for others is the most generous thing you can do.

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  • Seeing Suffering in the World and Not Feel Sadness:-
    For most people to look at the suffering in the world and not feel some sadness involves disassociating from their emotions. Taking on an attitude of “It doesn’t bother me,” is usually a mask of emotional denial. This is often the case if a person is not aware of their emotions or their compensating strategies. Developing true compassion may take more practice than simple denial.

The motivation for this kind of practice is usually driven by a desire to be happy. To be present with our emotions and not feel sad about the suffering of someone we love is not something we are conditioned to do in our society. In this society, it goes against the importance of being right and feeling justified. To be compassionate you must give up your personal beliefs about being right. By letting go of your own personal agenda and embracing humility it is possible to be aware of the suffering of the world without interpreting it as injustice and feeling sorrow or pity.

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  • The Great Barrier to Compassion:-
    The great barrier to seeing the world with compassion is our personal beliefs about how the world should be. When we are attached to those beliefs we have two pictures in our mind at the same time. The judge part of our mind automatically makes a comparison and we end up rejecting the present reality. Our desire and attachment to our imagined world are what traps us in reactions. When we let go of our imagined perfect world our inner judge has no grounds for rejecting the real one.

Some might argue that we should hold the vision of a better person or better world and keep it in our consciousness or strive towards it. This is a noble and valuable idea, but often the execution is distorted with an attachment to time. We expect our vision of the world to have already manifested and react with frustration or disappointment because it hasn’t. By having these reactions we fall out of the boat and into our emotional suffering.

We cannot help the world out of suffering if we cannot help ourselves. It is difficult to lift someone emotionally higher than where we are standing. This does not mean that you should do nothing People are starving and people are in pain in the world and much can be done to help. Recognize and be aware of the part you have to do for your self. You can do work on creating peace within yourself as you work on creating peace outside yourself.

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  • Action Steps for Transcending Emotional Suffering:-
    A specific action that will help you to be more accepting is to find and dissolve your core beliefs about how people should be. What conceptual idea is in your mind about how the world should be and when should it be that way? These artificial standards in the mind become the basis for judgment and emotional reactions. The second step is to become of aware of the emotions that these beliefs create. Becoming aware of the emotional pain born out of these beliefs will motivate you to suspend your belief in these artificial standards. In this process, it may seem sensible to let go of our expectations for ourselves first. This is actually one of the hardest places to start. You may find it more productive if you begin with an inventory of expectations of other people.

This process can be humbling. When I challenged my own beliefs and break the cycle of my emotional reactions I realized how difficult it was to identify and change beliefs. Realizing the challenge helped me be more accepting of other people trapped in their own beliefs. I no longer expected them to change their emotional state simply with my suggestions. I knew that they would have to change their point of view and beliefs before their emotions could change. Sometimes the process can be quick; perhaps a wise teacher can help with a change of perspective. Other times what is called for is being present and unconditionally accepting for life as it is. As my awareness grew I became more accepting of all the different dimensions of life. I also became more humble as I let go of my personal agenda of how the world or people should be.

There is no difference between compassion and forgiveness. Both share an attitude of unconditional acceptance for a situation or person as they are without judgment or expectation of something else. When you forgive people you let go of your attachment to your expectations and wishes for something different. This is the same as actively accepting life as it is. When you forgive people and the world for whatever they will do in the future you will be accepting of them however they are. This act makes it possible to live without judgment and the resulting emotional reactions. In this way compassion for the world is the same as a complete act of forgiveness. This is the pathway to a happy and compassionate life.

''Life Knowledge With Ayurveda''

Ayurveda is the ancient knowledge that indicates the very measure of life, advising on the appropriate and inappropriate, happy and sorrowful conditions of living, and recommending practices auspicious for longevity.

The meaning of ‘Ayur’ is life, and ‘Veda’ means knowledge, so Ayurveda means ‘knowledge of the science of life’. Ayurveda was derived from the most cherished scripture of India; the Vedas. The four Vedas are the Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samaveda, and Atharvaveda.

The main classical Ayurveda texts begin with accounts of the transmission of medical knowledge from the Gods to sages, and then to human physicians.

The fundamentals on which the Ayurvedic system is based are essentially true for all ages and so can be easily adopted time after time, century after century. The philosophy of Ayurveda teaches a series of conceptual systems characterized by balance and disorder, health and disease. It teaches that a person’s mental, emotional and spiritual being are all interconnected and any kind of imbalance between them results in health disorder and diseases. Therefore, to be healthy, harmony must exist for the purpose of healing, thoughts, feelings and physical action.

Health and disease are defined in a very special way in Ayurveda. Ayurveda’s central tenant is that life is a manifestation of mind, body, soul, and spirit. Body and mind are prone to suffering while the spirit is free of any such trappings of life. Thus to remain healthy and happy, efforts are required to be made in the direction of maintaining harmony among all these elements and only then can one get closer to the goal of longevity and disease free life.

yogaayur

History:-

During the century 500-600 B.C., the sages Agasthya, Charaka, Sushrutha, Kashyapa, and others, systematized the references to illness, disease, health practices and medicines from the Vedas into the Samhitas (Compilations).

It is from the Samhitas that doctors have passed down the authentic knowledge of Ayurveda for preventative and curative approaches to health. A totally comprehensive system; Ayurveda is more than just a healing method – it is an entire philosophy of life.

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Ayurvedic Body Types

According to Ayurveda, each one of us has a unique mix of three body principals that constitute our mental, physical and spiritual well-being. These three principals are known as doshas, which are further classified as Vatta (air-ether), Kapha (water-earth) and Pitta (water).But each individual has its own unique constitution that is usually governed by one or two of the doshas predominantly. It means that our Ayurvedic constitution is mainly either of these doshas or a mixed constitution of two doshas like Vatta & Kapa, Kapa & Pitta or Vata & Pitta.

each-morning-we-are-born-again-buddha-14348027064kn8g

Philosophy:-

“I believe that for every illness or ailment known to man, that God has a plant out here that will heal it. We just need to keep discovering the properties for natural healing.”

Ayurveda removes the cause of disease and re-establishes balance to our system through herbal remedies and medicinal massage, as well as Yoga, Meditation and approaches to a spiritual lifestyle. According to Ayurveda, we are composed of three bodies – the physical, astral, causal i.e. the body, mind, and soul.

The earth existed billions of years before our arrival, which is estimated to be only three and a half million years ago. As our planet ages, we grow in universal wisdom and come to know the beauty of cosmic magnetism among all life forms.

Panchakarma-treatment-Ayurvedic-Detoxification.jpg

Panchakarma:-

“You do not see anything when you experience pure consciousness; you become everything.” 

Panchakarma is an Ayurvedic treatment classified as elimination or purgation therapy. An intensive and purifying curse of treatment. Panchakarma consists of five types of treatment to cleanse the body of toxins, restoring it to a state of purity and balance. Time spent in our peaceful jungle villas is just perfect for such a transformative and balancing procedures.

Hope It was pretty helpful and Thanks for reading:)

”Life Knowledge With Ayurveda”

Ayurveda is the ancient knowledge that indicates the very measure of life, advising on the appropriate and inappropriate, happy and sorrowful conditions of living, and recommending practices auspicious for longevity.

The meaning of ‘Ayur’ is life, and ‘Veda’ means knowledge, so Ayurveda means ‘knowledge of the science of life’. Ayurveda was derived from the most cherished scripture of India; the Vedas. The four Vedas are the Rigveda, Yajurveda, Samaveda, and Atharvaveda.

The main classical Ayurveda texts begin with accounts of the transmission of medical knowledge from the Gods to sages, and then to human physicians.

The fundamentals on which the Ayurvedic system is based are essentially true for all ages and so can be easily adopted time after time, century after century. The philosophy of Ayurveda teaches a series of conceptual systems characterized by balance and disorder, health and disease. It teaches that a person’s mental, emotional and spiritual being are all interconnected and any kind of imbalance between them results in health disorder and diseases. Therefore, to be healthy, harmony must exist for the purpose of healing, thoughts, feelings and physical action.

Health and disease are defined in a very special way in Ayurveda. Ayurveda’s central tenant is that life is a manifestation of mind, body, soul, and spirit. Body and mind are prone to suffering while the spirit is free of any such trappings of life. Thus to remain healthy and happy, efforts are required to be made in the direction of maintaining harmony among all these elements and only then can one get closer to the goal of longevity and disease free life.

yogaayur

History:-

During the century 500-600 B.C., the sages Agasthya, Charaka, Sushrutha, Kashyapa, and others, systematized the references to illness, disease, health practices and medicines from the Vedas into the Samhitas (Compilations).

It is from the Samhitas that doctors have passed down the authentic knowledge of Ayurveda for preventative and curative approaches to health. A totally comprehensive system; Ayurveda is more than just a healing method – it is an entire philosophy of life.

37119173600_9c2a61f13f_b.jpg

Ayurvedic Body Types

According to Ayurveda, each one of us has a unique mix of three body principals that constitute our mental, physical and spiritual well-being. These three principals are known as doshas, which are further classified as Vatta (air-ether), Kapha (water-earth) and Pitta (water).But each individual has its own unique constitution that is usually governed by one or two of the doshas predominantly. It means that our Ayurvedic constitution is mainly either of these doshas or a mixed constitution of two doshas like Vatta & Kapa, Kapa & Pitta or Vata & Pitta.

each-morning-we-are-born-again-buddha-14348027064kn8g

Philosophy:-

“I believe that for every illness or ailment known to man, that God has a plant out here that will heal it. We just need to keep discovering the properties for natural healing.”

Ayurveda removes the cause of disease and re-establishes balance to our system through herbal remedies and medicinal massage, as well as Yoga, Meditation and approaches to a spiritual lifestyle. According to Ayurveda, we are composed of three bodies – the physical, astral, causal i.e. the body, mind, and soul.

The earth existed billions of years before our arrival, which is estimated to be only three and a half million years ago. As our planet ages, we grow in universal wisdom and come to know the beauty of cosmic magnetism among all life forms.

Panchakarma-treatment-Ayurvedic-Detoxification.jpg

Panchakarma:-

“You do not see anything when you experience pure consciousness; you become everything.” 

Panchakarma is an Ayurvedic treatment classified as elimination or purgation therapy. An intensive and purifying curse of treatment. Panchakarma consists of five types of treatment to cleanse the body of toxins, restoring it to a state of purity and balance. Time spent in our peaceful jungle villas is just perfect for such a transformative and balancing procedures.

Hope It was pretty helpful and Thanks for reading:)

''Begging With Spiritual Tradition''

What is the significance of begging in the spiritual tradition? one gathers himself, but consciously begging has been used as a tool to drop oneself.

”Begging was used as a tool to drop yourself because in earning a living, you gather yourself.”

Once, there was a beggar who begged for everything. All his life, he lived in one tattered coat that he wore. Gradually, he gathered a certain reputation and people started going to him for all kinds of solutions. He became known as a very wise man. News reached the king who also started going to him seeking advice.

One day, the king said, “You should not be a beggar, you should become my minister.” The beggar replied, “What you are offering does not mean anything to me, but if it makes me useful to the people, I will take this offer under one condition: I must have one room in the palace which nobody should enter or inspect, including yourself. If anybody enters or inspects this room, I will no longer be your minister.” The king said, “Yes I will give you a room. Keep it any way you want. Why would I want to look into your room?”

This went on for a few years and the beggar, who was now the Chief Minister, could not go around in his beggar’s coat anymore, so he dressed properly. With time, he came to be immensely admired and became very dear to both the king and the people. Seeing his popularity and his unrivaled wisdom, the other ministers were very jealous. Some of the ministers began thinking, “He has got something suspicious in that room. That is why he does not want anybody to enter. It must be some plot he has against the king and the nation. Otherwise, why is he protecting it like that?”

The rumor built up, and it soon reached the king’s ears. The king got fired up and one day told the minister, “I want to see what is in the room.” The minister said, “You can see, but the moment you enter that room, I will go back and no longer be a minister.” The king, knowing the man’s wisdom, did not want to lose him, and so, restrained himself.

However, after some time the king became restless and people were telling him stories, “You are the king and no secrets must be hidden from you in your palace.” This went on until one day, the king insisted, “I must see that room.” The minister agreed, so the king went in. He saw nothing in the room. It was just a plain, empty room. Hanging on the wall was that old tattered coat the beggar used to wear.

The king looked at all this and asked, “Why did you keep this a secret? There is nothing here.” The minister answered, “During the day, I am a minister. At night, I wear that coat and sleep on the floor. This way I never get caught up in my position as a minister. But now that you broke the agreement, it is off.” He wore his coat and walked away.

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Begging Consciously

Begging in India was a part of the spiritual tradition. You did not select your food; you begged and ate whatever people gave you. It was considered a great privilege when a person on the spiritual path stood in front of your house and asked for food, and for you to offer food to him. Today, these traditions have been misused, and there are so many people wearing the uniform of a spiritual seeker who are just plain beggars in search of money and food. But when people begged consciously, it had a completely different meaning and possibility.

When someone stretches his hand in front of you, if you feel it is being misused, you can refuse and move along. If you feel that it is really coming out of genuine need, you must respond as a human being. Just think how difficult it would be for you to stretch your hand in front of someone on the street. That man is putting himself through that.

A beggar may be doing so out of helplessness, but a sanyasi is doing it consciously for his own growth so that he does not get too full of himself. A beggar does not have such great goals. He is just trying to fill his belly which he has become incapable of doing by himself.

Disability is not just in terms of losing a hand or a leg. You can become disabled just in the way you think and feel about life. Actually, almost the whole population is in some way handicapped because of their patterns of thinking and feeling towards life. Similarly, the beggar has gotten himself into a corner, and he thinks that begging is the easiest way to earn a living

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Dropping Yourself

A spiritual person, however, takes to begging because he wants to drop himself. The idea, “I earn my own living, my own money, my own food, my own home,” is a big part of your ego. One day, a guest came to Gautama the Buddha carrying a few flowers. It is a part of our culture that when people go to meet a guru, they take flowers as an offering.

When the man came, Gautama looked at him and said, “Drop it.” The man looked around and wondered, “What to drop?” He thought it was the flowers. He hesitated, “But I bought it for you.” Gautama again said, “Drop it.” So the man dropped the flowers. Gautama looked at him and again said, “Drop it.” The man said, “I have dropped the flowers. I bought them as a gift, but you asked me to drop them so I did. What else to drop?” Gautama said, “No, you drop yourself first. The flowers are not the problem. You plucked the flowers for me. That is fine, I will take them, but you drop yourself.”

”A beggar may be doing so out of helplessness, but a sanyasi is doing it consciously for his own growth so that he does not get too full of himself.”

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Begging was used as a tool to drop yourself because in earning a living, you gather yourself. But you drop yourself in just stretching your hand in front of someone, knowing and being fully conscious that you have the capability to earn your living, yet you still choose to beg. That is a tremendous shift in a human being. People may give you food or they might just ask you to get out. It does not matter, but being a beggar is not a small thing.

”Begging With Spiritual Tradition”

What is the significance of begging in the spiritual tradition? one gathers himself, but consciously begging has been used as a tool to drop oneself.

”Begging was used as a tool to drop yourself because in earning a living, you gather yourself.”

Once, there was a beggar who begged for everything. All his life, he lived in one tattered coat that he wore. Gradually, he gathered a certain reputation and people started going to him for all kinds of solutions. He became known as a very wise man. News reached the king who also started going to him seeking advice.

One day, the king said, “You should not be a beggar, you should become my minister.” The beggar replied, “What you are offering does not mean anything to me, but if it makes me useful to the people, I will take this offer under one condition: I must have one room in the palace which nobody should enter or inspect, including yourself. If anybody enters or inspects this room, I will no longer be your minister.” The king said, “Yes I will give you a room. Keep it any way you want. Why would I want to look into your room?”

This went on for a few years and the beggar, who was now the Chief Minister, could not go around in his beggar’s coat anymore, so he dressed properly. With time, he came to be immensely admired and became very dear to both the king and the people. Seeing his popularity and his unrivaled wisdom, the other ministers were very jealous. Some of the ministers began thinking, “He has got something suspicious in that room. That is why he does not want anybody to enter. It must be some plot he has against the king and the nation. Otherwise, why is he protecting it like that?”

The rumor built up, and it soon reached the king’s ears. The king got fired up and one day told the minister, “I want to see what is in the room.” The minister said, “You can see, but the moment you enter that room, I will go back and no longer be a minister.” The king, knowing the man’s wisdom, did not want to lose him, and so, restrained himself.

However, after some time the king became restless and people were telling him stories, “You are the king and no secrets must be hidden from you in your palace.” This went on until one day, the king insisted, “I must see that room.” The minister agreed, so the king went in. He saw nothing in the room. It was just a plain, empty room. Hanging on the wall was that old tattered coat the beggar used to wear.

The king looked at all this and asked, “Why did you keep this a secret? There is nothing here.” The minister answered, “During the day, I am a minister. At night, I wear that coat and sleep on the floor. This way I never get caught up in my position as a minister. But now that you broke the agreement, it is off.” He wore his coat and walked away.

fga5qya

Begging Consciously

Begging in India was a part of the spiritual tradition. You did not select your food; you begged and ate whatever people gave you. It was considered a great privilege when a person on the spiritual path stood in front of your house and asked for food, and for you to offer food to him. Today, these traditions have been misused, and there are so many people wearing the uniform of a spiritual seeker who are just plain beggars in search of money and food. But when people begged consciously, it had a completely different meaning and possibility.

When someone stretches his hand in front of you, if you feel it is being misused, you can refuse and move along. If you feel that it is really coming out of genuine need, you must respond as a human being. Just think how difficult it would be for you to stretch your hand in front of someone on the street. That man is putting himself through that.

A beggar may be doing so out of helplessness, but a sanyasi is doing it consciously for his own growth so that he does not get too full of himself. A beggar does not have such great goals. He is just trying to fill his belly which he has become incapable of doing by himself.

Disability is not just in terms of losing a hand or a leg. You can become disabled just in the way you think and feel about life. Actually, almost the whole population is in some way handicapped because of their patterns of thinking and feeling towards life. Similarly, the beggar has gotten himself into a corner, and he thinks that begging is the easiest way to earn a living

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Dropping Yourself

A spiritual person, however, takes to begging because he wants to drop himself. The idea, “I earn my own living, my own money, my own food, my own home,” is a big part of your ego. One day, a guest came to Gautama the Buddha carrying a few flowers. It is a part of our culture that when people go to meet a guru, they take flowers as an offering.

When the man came, Gautama looked at him and said, “Drop it.” The man looked around and wondered, “What to drop?” He thought it was the flowers. He hesitated, “But I bought it for you.” Gautama again said, “Drop it.” So the man dropped the flowers. Gautama looked at him and again said, “Drop it.” The man said, “I have dropped the flowers. I bought them as a gift, but you asked me to drop them so I did. What else to drop?” Gautama said, “No, you drop yourself first. The flowers are not the problem. You plucked the flowers for me. That is fine, I will take them, but you drop yourself.”

”A beggar may be doing so out of helplessness, but a sanyasi is doing it consciously for his own growth so that he does not get too full of himself.”

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Begging was used as a tool to drop yourself because in earning a living, you gather yourself. But you drop yourself in just stretching your hand in front of someone, knowing and being fully conscious that you have the capability to earn your living, yet you still choose to beg. That is a tremendous shift in a human being. People may give you food or they might just ask you to get out. It does not matter, but being a beggar is not a small thing.

''Life Of Buddha''

The Wild Geese

One day, as Prince Siddhartha was going through the royal gardens on his way to the river, a flock of wild geese, beautifully outlined against the sky, passed overhead. Devadatta, the Prince’s cousin, seeing the geese, shot an arrow into their midst and one of them fell, wounded, just in front of Siddhartha. He felt a tender compassion for the poor bird that lay bleeding at his feet. Lifting it up, he drew out the arrow very carefully, bound up the wound and took the bird with Him. Presently a messenger came to claim the bird, sent by Devadatta, but Siddhartha refused to give it up saying that it belonged to him who had saved its life, not to him who had tried to kill it.

The Buddha and the Wealthy Brahmin

One day a wealthy Brahmin was holding his harvest-home when the Buddha came and stood by with the begging bowl in his hands. The Brahmin got very angry and said, “I plow and sow, and having plowed and sown, I eat. It would be better if you were in like manner to plow and to sow, and then you would have food enough to eat without begging.” “O Brahmin, do not get incensed at my begging,” the Buddha answered, “I too, plow and sow, and having plowed and sown, I eat.” “You say, you are a husbandman, but I see no signs of it,” replied the Brahmin, “Where are your bullocks and the seed and the plow?” Then the Buddha answered, “Faith is the seed I sow and good works are the rain that fertilizes it. Wisdom and good works are the parts of the plow, and my mind is the guiding rein. I lay hold of the handle of the Law; earnestness is the goad I use and diligence is my daughter. Thus my plowing is done, destroying the weeds of delusion. The harvest that it yields is the ambrosia-fruit of Nirvana, and by this plowing, all sorrow ends.”

The Sacrifice of the Brahmin

A certain Brahmin had made preparations for a great sacrifice in honor of one of the ancient gods of the Hindus. Whole herds of sheep and goats had been driven together, ready to be slaughtered when the day of sacrifice should arrive. Now, it came to pass that the Buddha visited this Brahmin, and as they sat together, discussing many things, the Buddha spoke of the sacredness of all life, whether of men or animals, of the pure heart and upright ways which are of far higher value than a sacrifice necessitating the shedding of blood. For nothing but his own unbroken efforts after right doing and right thinking can avail a man; he cannot rid himself of his sins and delusions by making innocent creatures suffer. As the Brahmin listened; the Buddha’s words sank deep into his soul. He was convinced of their truth. Determined to spare the lives of all those animals that had been driven together for the day of sacrifice, the Brahmin ordered that they should be given their freedom. So instead of being slaughtered, they were turned loose on the hillside where they could roam at will, choose their own pasture, drink the clear water of the mountain streams and scent the cool and refreshing breezes that blew on the upland.

. Angulimala

Journeying to Kosala, the Buddha was warned not to pass through a certain forest, for here, in the deep recesses of the jungle, was the den of a famous robber chief, Angulimala. He was the terror of the whole country-side, for he lived by plundering unwary travelers and had committed many murders. He feared no one, and from the very palace of the king, the cries of his victims had been heard many a time. All attempts to capture this desperate man had failed. So he continued his ravages unpunished. The people of Kosala now besought the Buddha not to expose himself to the dangers of the robber’s territory. But Gautama knew no fear and heedless of all warnings, he made his way straight to the den of the robber. Angulimala, enraged at this boldness, determined to slay the intruder. But when he saw the Buddha, calm and self-possessed, and heard his words of kindness, the robber hesitated. His arm uplifted to kill hung helplessly by his side and his wrath cooled like the embers of a dying fire. As the Buddha reasoned with him, he changed his purpose and, before long, had confessed all his sins and declared his faith in the Doctrine. When the people saw the new disciple following his Master, they were amazed and could scarcely believe that this was the same man who had been the terror of their land for so many years. Angulimala became a monk and was renowned for his holiness.